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Elton John – The Captain & The Kid

$47.50 $35.00

The Captain & The Kid chronicles the events in Elton John and Bernie Taupin’s lives since they started working together nearly 40 years ago. The album opens with the rock-operatic ” Postcards from Richard Nixon”, in which the pair’s youthful fascination with America is used to relect the country’s broader attraction for British kids, and how our earlier affinities with its pop culture override more recent divisions. On a similar theme, “Just Like Noah’s Ark” captures the lads in the first flush of their stateside success, entranced by the county’s louche charm and sleazy promise, while “Wouldn’t Have You Any Other Way (NYC)” narrows their adoring focus to the Seventies Manhattan of Jeoy Gallo and Studio 54. Another for the collection of fans worldwide.

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SKU: Mercury 02517 75317 [7] Categories: , , Tags: ,

Description

AllMusic Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Ever since 2001’s Songs from the West Coast, Elton John and his longtime collaborator, Bernie Taupin, have been deliberately and unapologetically chasing their glory days of the early ’70s, but nowhere have they been as candid in evoking those memories as they are on 2006’s The Captain & the Kid, the explicitly stated sequel to 1975’s masterpiece Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy. That record was an autobiographical fantasia of John and Taupin’s early years — the days when they were struggling to make their mark, right up till their glorious success — and the idea behind this album is to tell the story of those salad days, which not only isn’t a bad idea at all — it’s clever and well-suited for John, the most self-consciously un-autobiographical of all major rock artists — but fits right into Elton’s desire to make records like he used to; after all, if he’s trying to sound like the way things used to be, he might as well sing about the way they used to be, too. And The Captain & the Kid is nothing if not a proudly nostalgic piece of work bearing no modern touches; even the synths that occasionally color this country-ish rock are old fashioned analog synths. It sounds like an dream project on paper, but like a lot of dream projects, The Captain & the Kid doesn’t quite live up to its lofty ideals. Part of the problem is that John has patterned the music not after Captain Fantastic — which lived up to its glamorama title through intense flights of camp and glitz that helped give its narrative a theatrical flair, not to mention a hell of a lot of color — but after the stripped-down, country-tinged pop and rock of Tumbleweed Connection and Honky Chateau. That is the sound at the core of most of his best music of the early ’70s, but it’s not necessarily the best choice for this album, since it doesn’t quite fit with the original Captain Fantastic or the gaudy story of their success; it’s a tale that calls for bright neon colors, and everything about this album is muted and tasteful.
It might not quite seem like what a Fantastic sequel should be — in fact, it seems more like a sequel to its direct predecessor, 2004’s Peachtree Road — but that’s hardly a bad thing. Like that album and Songs from the West Coast before it, The Captain & the Kid is a sharp, professional piece of work by sharp professionals conscious of their past and no longer wishing to rest on their laurels, so they’re consciously evoking their best work without quite recycling it. They might not hit their mark directly, but they get close enough — it may be a little self-conscious and the production is a shade too clean, but the performances are warm and intimate, so this music feels right even if it doesn’t necessarily feel exactly like Elton’s ’70s heyday.

 

1. Postcards From Richard Nixon
2. Just Like Noah’s Ark
3. Wouldn’t Have You Any Other Way (NYC)
4. Tinderbox
5. And The House Fell Down
1. Blues Never Fade Away
2. The Bridge
3. I Must Have Lost It On The Wind
4. Old 67
5. The Captain And The Kid

 

Additional information

Weight 0.480 kg
Dimensions 32.0 × 32.0 × 2.0 cm