Arnett Cobb –  Sizzlin’
Arnett Cobb – Sizzlin’
Another of Arnett Cobb's great Prestige sessions, this one from late 1960. Arnett Cobb and his tenor sax are joined by Red Garland on piano, J.C. Heard on drums and George Tucker on bass. The quartet cruises through six tunes – including two Arnett Cobb originals and a couple of old standards in 'The Way You Look Tonight' and 'Georgia On My Mind.'  
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Art Pepper Quintet – Smack Up
Art Pepper Quintet – Smack Up
Art Pepper left a legacy of innumerable appearances on records, but his sessions for Contemporary always seemed to find him in the best company and in the best shape. Here his impassioned alto sax is appropriately applied to the compositions of six saxophonists, among them Benny Carter, Ornette Coleman, and Pepper himself.  
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Betty Carter – Now It’s My Turn
Betty Carter – Now It’s My Turn
"Based upon the diversity of music, quality of product and their extraordinary rate of progress, Pure Pleasure Records is our re-issue record company of the year." - hi-fi+ Re-issue AllMusic Review by Scott Yanow The title of this out-of-print Roulette album was a bit premature for it would not be until the late '80s before Betty Carter was finally "discovered." An adventurous jazz singer whose musical integrity is almost as impressive as her talents at improvising, Carter is heard in top form throughout her obscure album. Assisted by pianist John Hicks, bassist Walter Booker and an unidentified drummer, Carter performs memorable renditions of such unlikely material as "Wagon Wheels," "Most Gentlemen Don't Like Love" and medleys of "Music Maestro Please/Swing Brother Swing" and "Just Friends/Star Eyes." Worth searching for.
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Bill Evans Trio –  How My Heart Sings
Bill Evans Trio – How My Heart Sings
Bill Evans's return to full activity in 1962 came almost a year after his celebrated trio recordings at the Village Vanguard. Just ten days after that classic 'live' session, bassist Scott LaFaro had died in a highway accident. Evans, deeply shaken, eventually re-formed his trio with the same drummer (Paul Motian) and Chuck Israels on bass.
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Bill Evans Trio – at Shelly’s Manne-Hole
Bill Evans Trio – at Shelly’s Manne-Hole
This is the last album Bill Evans made for his first label. That fact alone would give this at least historical significance; and there is surely also some importance to its being one of only two occasions on which the pianist was recorded for Riverside during "live" performance (the other, of course, resulted in the classic pair of Village Vanguard albums). But above all, these two nights at Shelly Manne's club in Hollywood marked the only recording by the excellent but short-term third trio; after the death of Scott LaFaro, bassist Chuck Israels joined Bill and Paul Motian; then in 1963 Los Angeles studio-stalwart drummer Larry Bunker made this brief but noteworthy contribution to the Evans legend.
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Billie Holiday : All or Nothing at All
Billie Holiday : All or Nothing at All
As this set demonstrates in the subtle blending and dissolving of moods within one number as well as in the emotional changes throughout the program as a whole, perhaps the primary reason Billie was always able to reach so deeply into her listeners is that more than any other jazz singer, she could communicate the complexities of feeling in which we're all involved.
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Charlie Mingus : East Coasting
Charlie Mingus : East Coasting
Charles Mingus is usually known for his wild, soulful and avant-garde compositions. "East Coasting" is mellow by comparison, but it still cooks on a musical level. The Mingus touches are there; the trombone, drummer Danny Richmond and of course the dark emotional undercurrent looms large, too. The personnel are all Mingus regulars, except for pianist Bill Evans, who would not be described as 'soulful' in the traditional sense, but his introverted and sensitive style works well with Mingus's music.
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Clark Terry / Freddie Hubbard / Dizzy Gillespie / Oscar Peterson – “The Alternate Blues
Clark Terry / Freddie Hubbard / Dizzy Gillespie / Oscar Peterson – “The Alternate Blues
These are not your classic "blowing sessions" where the players try to outdo each other. No, this is something quite different. Norman Granz revered the classic "jam session", of which this is a prime example; he produced dozens for the various labels he owned over the years. Playing this album we can see why. The heart of the blues is here in every measure.
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Coleman Hawkins – Good Old Broadway
Coleman Hawkins – Good Old Broadway
The pleasures of Good Old Broadway as toured by Coleman Hawkins and his colleagues are multiple and durable, and they focus again on the extraordinary reservoir of inventiveness which Hawkins has maintained throughout his long period of maturity.  As Roy Eldridge says, "One night you'll say he's played his best, and the next night he'll top that."
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Coleman Hawkins – The Hawk Relaxes
Coleman Hawkins – The Hawk Relaxes
Despite the inherent modesty of its title, The Hawk Relaxes is far more than merely a tenor saxophonist – albeit one of the greatest who ever lived – at his ease. Recorded for Prestige's Moodsville subsidiary, the album presents Coleman Hawkins, paterfamilias of the tenor and one of its master balladeers.
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Count Basie Big Band – “Farmers Market Barbecue”
Count Basie Big Band – “Farmers Market Barbecue”
From his earliest days in territory bands in the Southwest, Count Basie had a secret: How to make a collection of instrumentalists generate rhythmic thrust so irresistible that no listener's foot could remain motionless. Basie's swing was the opposite of tense. Relaxed is what it was, and powerful. Through five and a half decades, Basie never lost the ability to infect a band with his swing magic. This edition of his swing machine, recorded just a couple of years before his death, is evidence of the continuing force of that magic.
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Count Basie/The Kansas City 3  –  “For The Second Time”
Count Basie/The Kansas City 3 – “For The Second Time”
Once again, Basie’s poetic introductions, precise calibrations of touch and coloration and definitive swing create a joyous program of four venerable standards and an equal number of new blues. Bellson is empathetic throughout and dances with his brushes on “Sandman,” while Brown’s robust tone and earth-moving walking lines bring out the best in Basie the soloist and accompanist.
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